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XIX ISA World Congress of Sociology : consult the pre-program of the RC30 Sociology of Work

par Rédaction LEST - publié le

The XIX World Congress of Sociology will take place in Toronto, from July 15th to 21st, 2018. You can consult now the pre-program of the RC 30 Sociology of Work led by LEST (France), represented by Delphine Mercier (President) , and INRS (Canada), represented by María Eugenia Longo (Secretary), introduces you to the program.

08:30 - 10:20   RC 30 Session RC 30 Session RC 30 Session RC 30 Session
10:30 - 12:20 Joint Session RC30/RC34 Joint Session RC30/RC34
Joint Session RC23/RC30
RC 30 Session RC 30 Session RC 30 Session  
12:30 - 13:50   Integrative Session RC05/RC25/RC30/RC32        
14:30 - 16:20           Joint Session RC30/RC34
15:30 - 17:20 RC30 Invited Session RC 30 Session RC 30 Session RC 30 Session    
17:30 - 19:20 RC30 Invited Session Joint Session RC30/TG04 RC 30 Session RC 30 Session    
19:30 - 20:50 RC30 Cocktail     RC30 Business Meeting    
Monday, 16 July Tuesday, 17 July Wednesday, 18 July Thursday, 19 July Friday, 20 July Saturday, 21 July




Monday, 16 July 2018 : 10:30 - 12:20

Location : 801B (MTCC SOUTH BUILDING)
Language : Spanish, English and French
Session Organizers :
Ana MIRANDA, Facultad Latinoamericana de Ciencias Sociales, Argentina amiranda@flacso.org.ar
Mircea VULTUR, INRS-UCS, Canada, mircea.vultur@ucs.inrs.ca

Joint RC 30 Session-RC34
Power, Violence and Justice in the Labor World : The Youth at the Front Scene. I/II
The younger generations are further affected by the transformations of labor market. Their entry into the workforce is done in a context of inadequate labor laws, of flexibility in management and employment practices, as well as in an increasing impact of new technologies and breakdown of work collectives. The insertion processes become demanding in terms of qualification and skills, experience and evaluation of their individual capacities. Young people are strongly affected by new employment statutes (temporary, part-time, self-employed, interim workers), precariousness, insecurity and informality. These changes influence the different sequences of the career path (access to employment, work practice, career) with divers effects according to the social and personal characteristics of the young people. They can result in a loss of power over oneself, in a need to adapt, to submit to ongoing trends or, on the contrary, in a gain in autonomy that allows them to get around obstacles or put strategies in place. Within the organizations, young people are subjected to power relations, leading to different forms of violence either directly or indirectly, or on the contrary, to a strengthening of their position. Similarly, their different situations in the labor market can create feelings of injustice (intra and intergenerational), generating dissatisfaction, frustration, anger or deviance. We invite you to cross the axes of the general call (power, violence, justice) and to apply them tothe field of work (RC30) and youth (RC34), under the approach of career paths or of their overall life situation.

Monday, 16 July 2018 : 15:30 - 17:20

Location : 711 (MTCC SOUTH BUILDING)
Language : French and English
Session Organizers :
Jens THOEMMES, CERTOP-CNRS-University of Toulouse, France, thoemmes@univ-tlse2.fr
Klaus SCHMIERL, Institute for Social Science Research (ISF), Germany, klaus.schmierl@isf-muenchen.de
Ndeshi NAMUPALA, University of Namibia, Namibia, nnamupala@unam.na

RC30 Invited Session
Revisiting the Shifting Contours of Work in Urban Africa
This Invited Session will discuss some of important key issues about Labour Market in Africa. From informal employment among young people and street vendors or mobile phone markets, to unemployment in graduates and parents, or precariousness in different economy sectors, this session analyse global tendencies in African countries, showing the permeability of national borders with regard to labour market transformations.


Monday, 16 July 2018 : 17:30 - 19:20

Location : 711 (MTCC SOUTH BUILDING)
Language : English and French
Session Organizers :
Alfredo HUALDE, El Colegio de la Frontera Norte, Mexico, ahualde@colef.mx
Maria Eugenia LONGO, INRS-UCS, Canada, mariaeugenia.longo@ucs.inrs.ca

RC30 Invited Session
Power, Violence, Justice : The Labour Market in North America Countries
This Invited Session will discuss some of important key issues in our countries at this moment : green jobs and climate changes, status employment and inequality, informal and precarious work, immigrants’ rights and resistance, and intergenerational social mobility. Brilliant experts in each domain will present and discuss with the audience about work reality in North America.

  • Future Conditional : Labour Leadership in the Struggle to Slow Global Warming, Carla LIPSIG-MUMME, York University, CANADA
  • A Devaluation of Intergenerational Class Mobility ? the Dissociation between Class and Economic Mobility in Mexico, Patricio SOLIS, El Colegio de México, MEXICO
  • Employment Status and Structural Disparities in the Canadian Labor Market, Mircea VULTUR, Institut national de la recherche scientifique, CANADA
  • Worker Rights and Immigrant Resistance in Trump’s Racist America, Shannon GLEESON, CornellUniversity, USA
  • Informal and Precarious Work in Canada, Mexico, and the USA : Academic Sociologies, Public Sociologies, Activist Sociologies, Chris TILLY, University of California Los Angeles, USA

Monday, 16 July 2018 : 19:30 RC30 Cocktail – Conviviality moment

Tuesday, 17 July 2018 : 08:30 - 10:20

Location : 711 (MTCC SOUTH BUILDING)
Language : English
Session Organizers :
Fanny GALLOT, Université Paris Est Créteil, France, fanny.gallot@gmail.com
Guzel BAIMURZINA, The Institute of Sociology of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Russia, guzel.baimurzina2017@yandex.ru
Ulyana NAZAROVA, Bashkir State University, Russia, nazarovaua@mail.ru
Pascal BARBIER, Université Paris 1 Pantheon-Sorbonne, France, Pascal.Barbier@univ-paris1.fr
Ya-Han CHUANG, University Toulouse Jean Jaurès - LISST, France, yahanduken@gmail.com

Value of Job and Beauty Work : Making Choice in Appearance, Space and Time
Every job has its value. It is not only wage, but also a wide range of qualitative characteristics (working conditions, prestige, and distance from home). Value of the workplace varies in space and in time. Free choice of field and place of employment is one of the fundamental human rights. It is natural when people of any age seek good valuable jobs. They improve their skills, develop meaningful competence etc. But in some cases human rights don’t meet the opportunities. Excessive spatial differentiation of the value of jobs creates uncontrolled migration flows, distorts economic structures, and has destructive influence on labour mobility. 2/ The "beauty work". We propose to examine the circulation of market power and symbolic violence by overlooking the various wage activities that can be conceptualized as “beauty work”. Here, the “beauty work” refers to the execution of a professional activity which conceives, produces, maintains or distributes the various socially defined forms of appearances. The sessions aims at reflecting on these professions, on their emergence, the content of their work, their qualifications, their limits, until the social characteristics and the individual who execute these professions, as well as the segmentation and stratification of the sector, as well as their role as the prescriber or “the canons of beauty.”

Tuesday, 17 July 2018 : 10:30 - 12:20

Location : 711 (MTCC SOUTH BUILDING)
Language : English
Session Organizers :
Maria Eugenia LONGO, INRS-UCS, Canada, mariaeugenia.
longo@ucs.inrs.ca

Ana MIRANDA, Facultad Latinoamericana de Ciencias Sociales (FLACSO, Argentina and Facultad Latinoamericana de Ciencias Sociales, Argentina, amiranda@flacso.org.ar
Discussant :
François SARFATI, Conservatoire National des Arts et Métiers Lise France, f_sarfati@hotmail.com

Joint RC 30 Session-RC34
Power, Violence and Justice in the Labor World : The Youth at the Front Scene. II/II
The younger generations are further affected by the transformations of labor market.
Their entry into the workforce is done in a context of inadequate labor laws, of flexibility in management and employment practices, as well as in an increasing impact of new technologies and breakdown of work collectives. The insertion processes become demanding in terms of qualification and skills, experience and evaluation of their individual capacities. Young people are strongly affected by new employment statutes (temporary, part-time, self-employed, interim workers), precariousness, insecurity and informality. These changes influence the different sequences of the career path (access to employment, work practice, career) with divers effects according to the social and personal characteristics of the young people. They can result in a loss of power over oneself, in a need to adapt, to submit to ongoing trends or, on the contrary, in a gain in autonomy that allows them to get around obstacles or put strategies in place. Within the organizations, young people are subjected to power relations, leading to different forms of violence either directly or indirectly, or on the contrary, to a strengthening of their position. Similarly, their different situations in the labor market can create feelings of injustice (intra and intergenerational), generating dissatisfaction, frustration, anger or deviance. We invite you to cross the axes of the general call (power, violence, justice) and to apply them to the field of work (RC30) and youth (RC34), under the approach of career paths or of their overall life situation.

Tuesday, 17 July 2018 : 10:30-12:20

Location : 709 (MTCC SOUTH BUILDING)
RC23 Sociology of Science and Technology (host committee)
Language : English and French
Session Organizers :
Antonio MONIZ, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, FCTUNL, CICS.NOVA, Portugal, antonio.moniz@kit.edu
Tobias DREWLANI, Technische Universitat Munchen, Germany, tobias.drewlani@tum.de

Joint Session RC23-RC30
Technology and Work : New Sociological Approaches ?
Since industrialization, the relationship between technical change and labour structures has been highly complex, and is still being discussed and interpreted today. Recent studies (Brynjolfsson & McAfee, Frey & Osborne, Autor, and others) are contributing to that public debate. The use of information and communication technologies has had an enormous impact not only on the manufacturing sector, but also in the reorganization of the service sector. The worldwide integration of technical systems (e.g. in production, logistics, marketing, etc.) has also created new forms of global value chains, leading to substantial changes in the mode of work. Today, these changes can no longer be explained by a causal model, but new theoretical approaches are required to integrate the technological dimension into the new globalization debate, the long tradition of sociology of work, sociology of technology, and the debate about "subjectivization" of work. Singular aspects of technologies in the work process which bring about new developments (e.g. to new technologies in health care, cyber-physical systems, Industry 4.0, robotics) can be examined in the framework of sociology. The technological impacts of these developments in turn are integrated into a conceptual re-evaluation of the relationship between work and technology.

Tuesday, 17 July 2018 : 12:30-13:50

Location : 718A (MTCC SOUTH BUILDING)
Language : English
Invited Session
Session Organizer :
Stephanie CASSILDE, Centre d’Etudes en Habitat Durable, Belgium, stephanie.cassilde@cehd.be

Integrative Session
Language Diversity : The Role of Language In Unequal Knowledge Disseminations About Gender, Racism, Nationalism, Ethnic Relations, and Work
Integrative session of RC05 Racism, Nationalism and Ethnic Relations, RC25 Language and Society, RC30 Sociology of Work, RC32 Women in Society
This session is concerned with the circulation of scientific knowledge. Identifying the main channels for this circulation on researchers’ initiative (scientific publication, presentations during conferences, civil society addresses (newspaper articles, participation to radio broadcast, etc.), teaching, and research consultancy), the objective of this session is to offer critical approaches of knowledge disseminations looking at language issues.
While scientific publication and presentations during conferences are mainly subjected to the key role of English, other channels are either limited to a given audience or also limited because of the language used for the communication. Initiative like Global Dialogue, ISA multilingual publication, needs a strong support for the translation in various languages. And when submissions in several languages are encouraged, as for example for language, Discourse & Society, scholars still choose English.
One consequence in this time of digitalization, social networks, and potentially quick dissemination of knowledge, is that language issues are related to greater inequality towards the dissemination. While this question is not new – there was always a time for translation for the spread of (key) sociologists’ works – it challenges again our responsibilities and creativity to reflect and answer to the power, violence, and justice dimension of language.
Focusing on research related to gender, racism, nationalism, ethnic relations, and work, contributions will shed light on the role of language in unequal knowledge disseminations.

Tuesday, 17 July 2018 : 15:30 - 17:20

Location : 711 (MTCC SOUTH BUILDING)
Language : English
Session Organizers :
Byoung-Hoon LEE, Chung-Ang Univ., South Korea, bhlee@cau.ac.kr
Pamela MEIL, Colleague, Germany, pamela.meil@isfmuenchen.
de Klaus SCHMIERL, Institute for Social Science Research (ISF), Germany, klaus.schmierl@isf-muenchen.de]
Discussants :
Tobias DREWLANI, Technische Universität München Germany ; tobias.drewlani@tum.de
Simon SCHAUPP, Technical University of Munich Germany, simon.schaupp@tum.de

Digital Labor. Changing World of Work and Employment Relations in the Era of 4th Industrial Revolution. I/II
These days, the 4th Industrial Revolution(4IR) becomes a buzz word in many countries. The 4IR is characherized as a mega socio-economic transformation, which is driven by the fusing innovations of physical, digital and biological technologies, such as artificial intelligence (AI), internet of things (IoT), 3D printing, nanotechonology, autonomous vehicles, cyber physical system (CPS), genetic editing, mobile supercomputing & big data. As Klaus Schwab, the founder of the World Economic Forum, highlights in his book, the advent of the 4IR is seen as fundamentally changing the landscape of economic and business operations, and some advanced countries have taken strategic steps to reconfigure industrial structures and technological capabilities in this direction, as exemplified by Industry 4.0 in Germany. While the technological transformation of 4IR has become the center of attention among policymakers, business groups, and public media, little light has been cast on its impact over working people and the existing labor regimes. In this light, our session aims to collect and exchange research findings about the effect of recent technological changes, led by any elements of the 4IR, on working life and employment relations, and how working people and labor unions have responded to these transformations at their workplaces and in the state- and industry-level policy-making, in different countries and diverse industrial sectors.

Tuesday, 17 July 2018 : 17:30 - 19:20

Location : 713A (MTCC SOUTH BUILDING)
Language : English and French
Session Organizers :
Frank SOWA, Institute for Employment Research (IAB), Germany, frank.sowa@th-nuernberg.de
Amina YAGOUBI, Université du Québec (Teluq), Canada, ayagoubi@teluq.uquebec.ca
Diane-Gabrielle TREMBLAY, Université du Québec (Teluq), Canada, dgtrembl@teluq.ca
Ronald STAPLES, Friedrich-Alexander-University, Germany, ronald.staples@fau.de
Discussants :
Philipp STAAB, Institut für die Geschichte und Zukunft der Arbeit Germany ; staab@igza.org
Bettina KOHLRAUSCH, Universität Paderborn Germany, bettina.kohlrausch@uni-paderborn.de

Joint RC 30 Session – TG04
Digital Labor. New Forms of Enterprises, of Collaborations and Work in the Digital Economy. II/II
Contemporary capitalism is characterized by risk of ruptures and uncertainty which appear at times ‘when a society or a mode of production enters into crisis and transition’ (Fournier, Hamel et Lecavallier, 2010). From then on, social and economic models are affected and need to change and reorganize. These changes presently touch all industrialized nations and the traditional national models are questioned. Industries need to adapt their value chains to the new environment. What is now called the 4th industrial revolution, invites the various sectors and firms to integrate the new numerical technologies in all their activities, commercialization, product innovation or even work organization.

  • First, the advent of the 4th industrial revolution, the numerical revolution, with a constant search for innovation and creativity ;
  • Secondly, a strong civic, private, public, national and local mobilization, where various ecosystems come together, bringing to the same table the associative, industrial, educational and political actors ;
  • And thirdly, there appears a new statute fo worker, an intermittent, project worker : the worker 2.0 who is found in various open innovation networks (P2P) (Chesbrough), for example ; at the other end of the spectrum, in the case of the uberization of work , we find a worker in the so-called collaborative or sharing economy. This uberization of work is however criticized and it would be interesting to have presentations and papers on these new forms of work and employment (an issue of the journal Interventions économiques-Papers in Political Economy is planned).

Wednesday, 18 July 2018 : 08:30 - 10:20

Location : 711 (MTCC SOUTH BUILDING)
Language : English
Session Organizers :
Bernard FUSULIER, Université catholique de Louvain, Belgium, bernard.fusulier@uclouvain.be
Diane-Gabrielle TREMBLAY, Université du Québec (Teluq), Canada, dgtrembl@teluq.ca

The ’work/Family Challenge’ in Intensive Work Contexts - Session I/III
The link between work and family has been an enduring focus for social research. This interest is due to the historical separation of the sphere of work and the sphere of family. Since the mid-nineties the ‘work-family challenge’ has become particularly prominent. This rise of interest is connected to contemporary socio-economic transformations : flexible working hours, feminisation of the labour market, intensification of work practices, mobility of the labour force, changing family composition and structure, the ageing population. The relationship between the worlds of employment and family/personal life is becoming a major issue for many people who have to ‘juggle’ with competing professional and other needs. Since the beginning of twenty first Century several authors have studied the contradictions between globalisation and work intensification, and the need for time to care for children and others, in gender equitable ways. Intensification of work is commonly experienced by working families in a particular demanding, competitive and pressured context. For many workers there are no work/life balance, but conflicts and tensions in intensive work contexts where labouris physically, psychologically and socially destructive. The professional and domestic spheres are closely articulated. The current emphasis on the relationship between work and family (and personal life) is understandable in this respect. This session address this issue from various points of view, including the role of economic and industrial policies, professions and occupations, working conditions and new patterns of productive work, the gender and intersectional perspectives, etc.

Wednesday, 18 July 2018 : 10:30 - 12:20

Location : 711 (MTCC SOUTH BUILDING)
Language : English
Session Organizers :
Bernard FUSULIER, Université catholique de Louvain, Belgium, bernard.fusulier@uclouvain.be
Diane-Gabrielle TREMBLAY, Université du Québec (Teluq), Canada, dgtrembl@teluq.ca

The "Work/Family Challenge" in Intensive Work Contexts - Session II/III
The link between work and family has been an enduring focus for social research. This interest is due to the historical separation of the sphere of work and the sphere of family. Since the mid-nineties the ‘work-family challenge’ has become particularly prominent. This rise of interest is connected to contemporary socio-economic transformations : flexible working hours, feminisation of the labour market, intensification of work practices, mobility of the labour force, changing family composition and structure, the ageing population. The relationship between the worlds of employment and family/personal life is becoming a major issue for many people who have to ‘juggle’ with competing professional and other needs. Since the beginning of twenty first Century several authors have studied the contradictions between globalisation and work intensification, and the need for time to care for children and others, in gender equitable ways. Intensification of work is commonly experienced by working families in a particular demanding, competitive and pressured context. For many workers there are no work/life balance, but conflicts and tensions in intensive work contexts where labouris physically, psychologically and socially destructive. The professional and domestic spheres are closely articulated. The current emphasis on the relationship between work and family (and personal life) is understandable in this respect. This session address this issue from various points of view, including the role of economic and industrial policies, professions and occupations, working conditions and new patterns of productive work, the gender and intersectional perspectives, etc.

Wednesday, 18 July 2018 : 15:30 - 17:20

Location : 711 (MTCC SOUTH BUILDING)
Language : English
Session Organizers :
Bernard FUSULIER, Université catholique de Louvain, Belgium, bernard.fusulier@uclouvain.be
Diane-Gabrielle TREMBLAY, Université du Québec (Teluq), Canada, dgtrembl@teluq.ca

The "Work/Family Challenge" in Intensive Work Contexts - Session III/III
The link between work and family has been an enduring focus for social research. This interest is due to the historical separation of the sphere of work and the sphere of family. Since the mid-nineties the ‘work-family challenge’ has become particularly prominent. This rise of interest is connected to contemporary socio-economic transformations : flexible working hours, feminisation of the labour market, intensification of work practices, mobility of the labour force, changing family composition and structure, the ageing population. The relationship between the worlds of employment and family/personal life is becoming a major issue for many people who have to ‘juggle’ with competing professional and other needs. Since the beginning of twenty first Century several authors have studied the contradictions between globalisation and work intensification, and the need for time to care for children and others, in gender equitable ways. Intensification of work is commonly experienced by working families in a particular demanding, competitive and pressured context. For many workers there are no work/life balance, but conflicts and tensions in intensive work contexts where labouris physically, psychologically and socially destructive. The professional and domestic spheres are closely articulated. The current emphasis on the relationship between work and family (and personal life) is understandable in this respect. This session address this issue from various points of view, including the role of economic and industrial policies, professions and occupations, working conditions and new patterns of productive work, the gender and intersectional perspectives, etc.

Wednesday, 18 July 2018 : 17:30 - 19:20

Location : 711 (MTCC SOUTH BUILDING)
Language : English and French
Session Organizers :
Philippe MOSSÉ, LEST-CNRS-AMU, France, philippe.mosse@univ-amu.fr

Care Work : Facing New Challenges, Involving Professionals and Non-Professionals.
Lessons from International Comparisons

To cope some of the main consequences of social and economic violence, specific professional’s skills, such as those involved in “Care Work” have to be adapted and improved. On the other hand, in many countries, “lay people” are ask to be more involved in the definition of practical responses to different types of injustices. Moreover, a move from “Cure” to “Care” in societies where more and more individuals are vulnerable, is emerging.In this context, the new ethics of care leads to take into account not only each patient / family’ needs but also each patient / family capabilities.
But, at the same time, the professionalization of Care Work is increasing in almost every developed countries. It comes with a valuation of activities related to care and, to some extent, with the acknowledgment of technical skills associated to those activities along with relational ones.
Therefore, Care Work professionals, as well as their “clients”, have to gain new kinds of responsibilities in a time when the State’s legitimacy is in jeopardy.
This dynamic goes against a type of “naturalization” of care activities perceived as to be performed by women on a domestic if not, benevolent basis.
International comparisons of Care Work development are but a good way to address this topics as gender issue as well as professionalization are historically and socially defined.
The expected communications for this session should be grounded on studies involving at least two countries in a quantitative and / or a qualitative perspective.

Thursday, 19 July 2018 : 08:30 - 10:20

Location : 711 (MTCC SOUTH BUILDING)
Language : Spanish, French and English
Session Organizers :
Flora BAJARD, LEST (Institute of Labour Economics and Industrial Sociology) - France, France, flora.bajard@univ-amu.fr

Mobilizations among the « Grey zones » of Wage-earning status and Self-employment.
Power Struggles in the Worlds of Work.

Among the « grey zones » of employment, the elements inherent in wage-earning status and self-employment have been called into question, generating non-standard forms of labour and employment. This session focuses on situations involved by the blurry outlines of salaried situations and self-employment : “false self-employed” workers, i.e. dependent self employed who are actually a kind of employee, and "false wage-earners", i.e solo selfemployed who get a pay slip through cooperative – cooperative or umbrella companies. The aim of the communications is to shed light on the political dimension and power struggles of such situations : transformation of the autonomy at work, exclusion from social protection systems, struggles with the employer or ordering costumer, competition with other workers, fluctuations of the authority within the work community, disintegration or reinforcement of solidarity networks, etc.
The communications may stress the following points :

  • The political claims and goals of workers, in terms of rights, new frames of employment, symbolic acknowledgment, transformations of industrial relations and collective bargaining…
  • The forms of collective action : shaping of new groups of workers, resorting to “violent” actions or to law, emergence of coalitions with existing social movements, use of new technologies.
  • The consequences on professional contents : how do workers may then auto-determine the contents and frontiers of their activity, in other words, control its professionalization ? Through qualitative or quantitative research methods, the communications will show how these power struggles occur among various arenas and places of/around the worlds of work.

Thursday, 19 July 2018 : 10:30 - 12:20

Location : 711 (MTCC SOUTH BUILDING)
Language : English
Session Organizers :
Klaus SCHMIERL, Institute for Social Science Research (ISF), Germany, klaus.schmierl@isf-muenchen.de

New Strategies and Networks of Trade Unions : Globalisation and International Collaboration
Trade Unions are important actors in regulating national power, violence and justice. In the session we will discuss some recent answers of Trade Unions to accelerating trends like globalisation, transnational production and service chains, and new technological developments (digitalization).

Thursday, 19 July 2018 : 15:30 - 17:20

Location : 711 (MTCC SOUTH BUILDING)
Language : English
Session Organizers :
Helen SAMPSON, Cardiff University, School of Social Sciences, United Kingdom, sampsonh@cf.ac.uk
Jose Ricardo RAMALHO, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, josericardoramalho@gmail.com

Silencing Our Voices ? The Impact of the Globalisation of Labour Markets on Terms and Conditions and the Capacity of Workers to Resist Negative Transformation
The phenomenon of globalisation is only just coming to be understood by broader publics as a violent assault on standards, incomes and rights. In the context of globalised labour markets, workers from different parts of the world are pitted against one and other and forced to engage in a ‘race to the bottom’. This process plays out as multinationals insist that employees accept reductions in pay/working conditions, or face their job relocation. It also plays out in labour-markets where plant/workers are mobile e.g. shipping, or where the workplace is a worker’s home/car, or a service user’s premises, as is the case with digital/platform working. These scenarios have in common the ways in which workers are disempowered by fear. In such situations they frequently engage in competition for the basic right to work rather than finding forms of collective resistance. This session will provide an insight into the ways in which workers in the formal/informal sectors are caught up in the global competition for employment and the sacrifices in wages/conditions/rights, that they are making to secure work. The key questions are :

  1. How are standards in terms and conditions being undermined by globalisation ?
  2. How are workers responding to this changing context ?
    In this respect we welcome accounts of acquiescence alongside accounts of resistance and seek to shed light on both established, and new, forms of work where global labour markets operate.

Thursday, 19 July 2018 : 17:30 - 19:20

Location : 711 (MTCC SOUTH BUILDING)
Language :
Session Organizers :
Delphine MERCIER, Laboratoire d’Économie et de Sociologie du Travail, France, delphine.mercier@univ-amu.fr
Maria Eugenia LONGO, INRS-UCS, Canada, mariaeugenia.longo@ucs.inrs.ca

Transformations on Labour Market. Experiencing Injustice and Violence
Gender issues become stronger regarding to labor market transformations. Demand for autonomy and workers selfresponsibility appear not only linked to employment task and contracts, management and job organization, but also regarding work and family balance, life and temporalities. International perspectives and experiences of workers from different countries about this situation are presented in this session.

Thursday, 19 July 2018 : 19:30 - 20:50

Location : 711 (MTCC SOUTH BUILDING)
RC30 Business Meeting

Friday, 20 July 2018 : 08:30 - 10:20

Location : 711 (MTCC SOUTH BUILDING)
Language : English, Spanish and French
Session Organizers :
Mustapha EL MIRI, Laboratoire d’Économie et de Sociologie du Travail, AMU CNRS, France, mustapha.el-miri@univ-amu.fr
Delphine MERCIER, Laboratoire d’Économie et de Sociologie du Travail, France and LEST UMR 7317, France, delphine.mercier@univ-amu.fr

Migrations and Work in a Critical Perspective of Analyzes of Migration in the Context of Globalization and Resurgence of the Violence of Racial Boundaries
Articulate migration and work in a critical perspective of analyzes of migration in the context of globalization and resurgence of the violence of racial boundaries. Interest in migration issues has increased considerably over the last decade with three impetus : the first is linked to the economic and labor market globalization of the last few years and to the intensification of the circulation which gives a Visibility to the migratory phenomenon and extirpates old North/South schemes ; The second is linked to the transnational circulation of knowledge on these issues, to the confrontation of approaches between national traditions and to the disciplinary and transdisciplinary institutionalization of research on migration, and the third is the involvement of researchers from Migrations or researchers of "minorities" who provide critical insight into the theories of intersectionality. But this abundance has as a corollary the fragmentation of the field of study of migrations. Old approaches continue to coexist with new research.
The point of this session is double :

  1. Recovering knowledge by reopening the epistemological and empirical debate, articulating migration and work in a retroactive critical view of analyzes of migration, but also in the context of globalization and the resurgence of racial boundaries in present-day social relations.
  2. Identify the new epistemological and empirical approaches that characterize the labor migration articulation and to emphasize the relevance of the contribution of this phenomenon in the understanding of contemporary social transformations.

Friday, 20 July 2018 : 10:30 - 12:20

Location : 711 (MTCC SOUTH BUILDING)
Language : English
Session Organizers :
Winifred POSTER, Washington University, St. Louis, USA, wrposter@gmail.com
Kiran MIRCHANDANI, University of Toronto, Canada, kiran@oise.utoronto.ca

Intersections of Labour and Nationhood in Transnational Service Work
The aim of this session is to trace the connections between two dynamics underlying transnational service encounters between employees and customers – service labor and constructions of nationhood. While “labor” has been explored largely in relation to notions of the economy and market, and “nation” in relation to politics and the state, this stream draws attention to the intersection : the labor involved in constructing nations, and nationalisms implicit in doing service labor. Papers on a wide array of transnational service work which explores these dynamics of labor and nation are invited. Examples may include research on offshored call center work, telehealth, international educational initiatives etc. Papers will explore the many ways workers engaged in cross-national service exchanges create imaginaries of nations, both their own and those in which their customers are based. Some of the questions which contributors could explore include : How are ideas of nation, nationhood, and nationalism manifested in cross-national service exchanges ? How are citizens and outsiders constructed during service encounters ? How do histories and geographies impact the enactment of various cross-national service interactions ? How do the relationships between gender, race, class, sexuality, and nation impact service encounters ? Critically, how does the national intersect with the transnational, in rhetoric, imageries, and practices ?

Saturday, 21 July 2018 : 14:30 - 16:20

Location : 701A (MTCC SOUTH BUILDING)
Language : Spanish, French and English
Session Organizers :
Stephanie CASSILDE, Centre d’Études en Habitat Durable, Belgium, stephanie.cassilde@cehd.be
Adeline GILSON, University of Tours, France, adeline.gilson@univ-tours.fr
Joint Session RC25-RC30
Language and Work : Categorizations and Significations of Work and Employment
This session is concerned with international comparisons of subjective representations of work and employment in a context of flexibilization of work and in structural violence exercised within the labour market in many countries of the world. These representations are approached in this session through language (discourses and speech acts).
Boundaries between working and living places and times may be blurred by new working organizations and news working tools (including digital tools and new technologies) in a capitalist globalization which increases inequalities. Current forms of employments, including atypical statuses for workers, invite to investigate how this may change (or not) what “working” means in its regional diversity.
Do subjective representations of work lead to categorize a given activity as work while it was not the case previously ? How is this interrelated with subjective representations of work and employment ? How do stakeholders communicate about these representations and which is the relation between them ?
Discussing sociological investigations of language, contributions will shed light on analyses of individual and collective practices and subjective representations of work and employment by workers, unions, businesses and/or employment system.